Continental and Magna Plans for U.S.-Canada Border Self-driving Test

Must Read

Mohammed Montaha Hossain
Mohammed Montaha Hossain
Content Editor, Proofreader, Creative Writer a new guy on this platform. Eager to learn more as time progresses and find quality work. I am very fluent in English and I have a very fast typing speed.

The first autonomous border crossing is set to take place in the next couple of months.  Automobile maker Continental and vehicle provider Magna plan to send two self-driving vehicles from southeastern Michigan to Sarnia, Ontario, as per Engadget.

Parts of the course will be dealt with by human drivers. However, the group trusts a large portion of it to be autonomous. The change from the U.S. to Canadian street signs, speed points of confinement, and driving quirks will be a troublesome change for a self-driving vehicle, which ordinarily drives in a similar city for a considerable length of time.

Continental said it would utilize a blend of Lidar, radar, and cameras for the self-driving framework, like what most automakers and tech firms use in standard tests. It didn’t say which brand of auto it would use for the test, despite being part of the BMW self-driving consortium.

The Michigan-Ontario border crossing is one frequented by cargo trucks, which are well on their way to seeing automation in the not-so-distant future, as indicated by a report by market surveying firm Forrester.

Continental has made a couple of noteworthy moves in the previous half year to make it an essential player in the advancement of self-driving vehicles. It began testing a shuttle route in Frankfurt and announced a major investment in autonomous software and parts.