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Apple and Intel patents for an MR headset with chemical sense response

New Intel Patent

In the long term, Apple has unveiled big plans for a VR system to deliver a great experience in context with next-gen autonomous technology. In the short term, Apple continues to bring new patents on AR and VR systems, and recently Apple is taking its time to deliver a great new iDevice for their global base of customers.

It is worth appreciating because the buzz for VR headsets is falling for lack of quality content unique experiences and Apple is mainly focusing on new technology to make its fan base much stronger with its MR headset technology patent.

Mixed Reality (MR) technology can be a confusing concept for many. It is not just Virtual reality or just Augmented reality, it is a mix of the two, though far more VR than AR. The abstract for Apple’s patent application with Intel generates for an MR headset along with a chemical response in addition to visual and audio effects.

The patent filed is very much interesting if only we are to discern the path, Apple is taking as it adds taste, smell and other chemical response in the MR headset that could be powered by processors like, Intel Core, AMD Ryzen, and Qualcomm Snapdragon.

This exciting technology is something that could apparently make the surreal environment much more real. For example, bringing chemical responses like taste and smell including sweetness, salty taste, or even a combination of several flavors to the headset. The fun fact about  MR headset, yet unknown but interesting is that each user will have their own reaction to the chemical stimuli that the headset will provide. A user’s effect might be impacted according to the user’s age, one’s cultural background or even by the environment of the user.

As the patent generates, we could run through many of these applications, and to the point of the matter, the addition of such Mixed Reality with chemical response might boost the potential of such technology to see the light.

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Apple and Intel patents for an MR headset with chemical sense response