Apple gives probation to Pegatron, the iPhone assembling company

Author at TechGenyz Apple
iPhone Assembler
Credit: @denic | Unsplash

The California-based smartphone giant, Apple apparent is almost on the verge of cutting off working ties with the Taiwanese company Pegatron for condoning values that Apple does not support. The company in question, Pegatron, is the world’s second-largest iPhone assembler.

According to the news source, the contractor for Pegatron allowed students to work at night, overtime, and outside their specialty. Apparently, Apple does not support students overworking outside their specialty. Students could easily work under Pegatron assembling iPhones without any special circumstances whatsoever, but under the terms of a special program;

However, there was one condition that Apple adhered strictly to, and it states that students should never overwork, or take night shifts, or work outside their specialty. According to Apple, Pegatron violated all of those values regarded highly by Apple.

According to reports, the Taiwanese company, Pegatron, allowed students to choose their own working conditions in Shanghai and Kunshan in eastern China.

Emphasizing it time and again, Apple strictly mentioned that this goes completely against their core principles.

Judging the situation as it is, and keeping in mind the extent and gravity of the violation, the smartphone giant gave Pegatron a probationary period. Although this does not mean that Apple will completely stop working with the company, it does give time to the company to acknowledge its mistakes, and take the necessary steps to redeem it.

As per the conditions given out by Apple, Pegatron will use the probationary period to resolve the students’ situation completely and revise its rules to ensure that situations like this do not occur in the future.

“Pegatron will not receive any new orders from us until they correct the situation,” an Apple spokesman said. As part of contingency, Pegatron mentioned that the company has fired the student program’s head found to be responsible.

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