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Antarctica’s ice loss at an accelerating rate, increasing global sea levels by 0.12 inch

Antartica Ice Loss

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Antarctica’s shedding has increased at an accelerated rate. Since 2012, the Antartica ice loss has tripled thus increasing global sea level by 0.12 inch (3 millimeters) in that timeframe alone. Satellites monitoring the state of the White Continent assessed that around 200 billion tones have been lost to the ocean as a result of melting.

According to the study funded by NASA and ESA (European Space Agency), indicates that ice losses from Antarctica are causing sea levels to rise faster today than at any time in the past 25 years. The new balance has been published in the journal Nature that was published on Wednesday.

Global Warming Increasing Sea LevelThe government needs to take measures to the found information as they plan future defenses to protect low-lying coastal communities. According to the research it is claimed that the losses are taking place largely in the Western side of the continent, where warm water is melting the front of the glaciers that terminate in the ocean.

This is the most robust study of the ice mass balance of Antarctica to date – assessment team co-lead Erik Ivins at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

From 1992 to 2017 the mass balance sheet has been under observance which found the ice losses that raised the sea level by 0.3 inches. Space agencies have been flying satellites over Antarctica, combining 24 satellite surveys of Antarctica and involving 80 scientists from 42 international organizations. These spacecraft have better ability to weigh the Antartica ice sheet by sensing changes in the pull of gravity as they pass overhead.

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Prior to 2012 ice was lost at a steady rate but since 2012 the amount of ice loss per year has tripled to 241.4 billion tons. The greatest change has been most experienced by Antarctica with ice loss rising from 58.4 billion tons (53 billion metric tons) per year in the 1990s, to 175.3 billion tons (159 billion metric tons) a year since 2012.

The latest edition of the journal Nature has a number of studies looking at the state of the continent the northern tip of the continent, ice-shelf collapse at the Antarctic Peninsula has driven an increase of 27.6 billion tons, meanwhile the east part of Antarctica has remained relatively balanced during the past 25 years gaining 5.5 billion tons of ice per year.

Data from these missions will help scientists connect the environmental drivers of change with the mechanisms of ice loss to improve our projections of sea level rise  – Wagner

In Imbie’s last appraisal, Antarctica’s contribution to the global sea-levels was considered to be tracking at the lower end of the projections; the new assessment finds the contribution track the upper end of these projections.

Source: NASA

Antarctica’s ice loss at an accelerating rate, increasing global sea levels by 0.12 inch